COVID-19 Response Plan

Download the entire WSD COVID-19 Response Plan Here (PDF)

WSD Specific Details & Protocols

Q: I have had a confirmed exposure to someone with COVID-19. If I get a negative test, can I return to work/school?

Q: I have symptoms of COVID-19. When can I return to work/school?

Q: I have tested positive for COVID-19. When can I return to work/school?

Q: I was exposed to somebody who was exposed to somebody with COVID-19. Do I need to quarantine?

Q: What is the definition of an “exposure” to COVID-19?

Q: A student exhibits symptoms or is too ill to remain at school. The parents have no means for transporting the student home. What will happen?

Q: Someone in my household is positive for COVID-19. How long should I quarantine?

Q: What is considered an outbreak, and what is the protocol for shutting down a classroom or a building?

Q: If anyone in my household is under quarantine, including myself, do the other members of my household need to quarantine as well?

Q: I have previously tested positive for COVID-19. Do I need to quarantine if I come in close contact with a positive case?

Q: How do I go about getting tested?

Q: After an exposure, do I have to be out for the full 14 days, or can I reduce my quarantine period?

Q: How can I calculate an isolation period (for someone who is positive) or a quarantine period (for someone identified as a close contact)?

Frequently Asked Questions – Vaccine

Q: Where can I learn more about the available vaccines?

Q: Once I receive the vaccine, do I still need to fill out the staff attestation form?

Q: If I am vaccinated and answer yes to any of the questions on the attestation, do I have to stay home?

Q: If I am fully vaccinated and I have an exposure to someone with COVID-19, do I still need to quarantine?

Q: What does it mean to be “fully vaccinated”?

Q: Now that I’ve been fully vaccinated, what has changed?

Frequently Asked Questions – General Response

Q: I have had a confirmed exposure to someone with COVID-19. If I get a negative test, can I return to work/school?

A: No, unfortunately exposure to COVID-19 requires a 14-day quarantine. This is because it can take between 2 and 14 days for the virus to incubate in the body, so you may test negative at first but become infected with the virus later.

Q: I have symptoms of COVID-19. When can I return to work/school?

A: If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you can return to work/school under three conditions:

  1. You receive a negative COVID PCR test and symptoms have improved and you have not had a fever in 24 hours;
  2. You wait 10 days from the onset of symptoms and symptoms have improved and you have not had a fever in 24 hours;* 
    *Note this is the option when you test positive for COVID-19, but can be followed without a test as well.
  3. You submit a note from your primary care physician to your supervisor that states a specific diagnosed condition or medication that is causing these symptoms, and that they are unrelated to COVID-19.

Q: I have tested positive for COVID-19. When can I return to work/school?

A: To return to work/school, you will need a clearance letter from Clark County Public Health (CCPH), which you can request directly from them. Factors CCPH uses when determining if someone can return include all of the following:

  1. 10 days since the onset of symptoms;
  2. Symptoms have improved;
  3. You have not had a fever in 24 hours.

Q: I was exposed to somebody who was exposed to somebody with COVID-19. Do I need to quarantine?

A: No, this would be considered a secondary exposure. This would not warrant a response unless the person who you were directly exposed to developed symptoms of COVID-19 or tested positive.

Q: What is the definition of an “exposure” to COVID-19?

A: To be what the CDC considers “exposed” to COVID-19, you have to have come into direct contact with the respiratory droplets of the infected person. This can be through sharing utensils, being coughed on, kissing, sharing drinks, etc. This can also be through spending more than 15 minutes within 6 feet of an infected person, with or without a mask.

Q: A student exhibits symptoms or is too ill to remain at school. The parents have no means for transporting the student home. What will happen?

A: The school will work with parents to arrange alternate transportation home.

Q: Someone in my household is positive for COVID-19. How long should I quarantine?

A: If someone in your household is positive for COVID-19, you have two options.

  1. Avoid any further close contact with the positive household member. This means using a separate bathroom if possible, not getting within 6 feet of them, and avoiding contact in general. In this scenario, you can return 14 days after the last contact you had with the positive person.
  2. If further close contact cannot be avoided, you must quarantine for the duration of the illness plus 14 days.

Q: What is considered an outbreak, and what is the protocol for shutting down a classroom or a building?

A: Although every situation is going to be different, and we will take direction from the Clark County Public Health Department with any and all positive cases of COVID-19, the general guidance for an outbreak is below:

Dismiss the entire classroom for 14 days if two or more laboratory positive COVID-19 cases occur within within a 14 day period.

Close school and switch to remote learning for 14 days when:

  • 2 or more classrooms are dismissed due to an outbreak;
  • School cannot function due to insufficient teaching or support staff

Q: If anyone in my household is under quarantine, including myself, do the other members of my household need to quarantine as well?

A: According to the health department, no, the other members of the household who did not have close contact with a person with COVID-19 do not need to quarantine as well. However, if the person in quarantine begins to show symptoms, everyone in the house should quarantine until the person showing symptoms can get a test for COVID-19.

Q: I have previously tested positive for COVID-19. Do I need to quarantine if I come in close contact with a positive case?

A: For those who have had confirmed COVID-19 and have recovered, you do not need to quarantine after close contact with a positive case for 3 months after first testing positive. If it has been more than 3 months since your positive test, you will need to quarantine again.

Q: How do I go about getting tested?

A: Follow this link to the WA State Department of Health webpage on testing locations. Call your health insurance provider for information on where you can get tested.

Q: After an exposure, do I have to be out for the full 14 days, or can I reduce my quarantine period?

A: It takes between 2 and 14 days for the virus to incubate in the body, which is why those who have been exposed need to quarantine for 14 days from their date of exposure. Although public health jurisdictions have offered options for reduced quarantine periods by utilizing monitoring and diagnostic testing, school districts are a high-priority setting and therefore are continuing to utilize the 14 day quarantine period.

Q: How can I calculate an isolation period (for someone who is positive) or a quarantine period (for someone identified as a close contact)?

A: Visit the WA Department of Health isolation and quarantine calculator to calculate isolation or quarantine periods.

Frequently Asked Questions – Vaccine

Q: Where can I learn more about the available vaccines?

A: Follow this link to the WA state Department of Health webpage on vaccines.

Q: Once I receive the vaccine, do I still need to fill out the staff attestation form?

A: Yes, you will still need to complete the daily staff attestation.

Q: If I am vaccinated and answer yes to any of the questions on the attestation, do I have to stay home?

A: If symptoms are consistent with vaccination (i.e. low grade fever, headache, malaise) and started within 3 days of receiving the vaccine then you may return to work after you have been fever free for 24-hours as long as you feel okay to do so. If symptoms are consistent with COVID-19 infection (i.e. cough, shortness of breath, loss of taste and smell, etc.) then you should be excluded per the COVID-19 exclusion process. When in doubt, contact your physician or a nurse help line. Click here to read further information on CDC’s post vaccination considerations.

Q: If I am fully vaccinated and I have an exposure to someone with COVID-19, do I still need to quarantine?

A: As long as you are fully vaccinated (see question below) and asymptomatic, you do not need to quarantine after an exposure to someone who is positive for COVID-19. However, if you notice any symptoms, you should report home and contact your physician. For more information, click here.

Q: What does it mean to be “fully vaccinated”?

A: For those who have received the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, you are considered fully vaccinated when it has been more than 2 weeks since your second dose. For those who have received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, you are considered fully vaccinated when it has been more than 2 weeks since your shot. For more information, click here.

Q: Now that I’ve been fully vaccinated, what has changed?

A: The CDC has released some recommendations for what has changed after being fully vaccinated. Click here to review their list of recommendations.

Comprehensive Flowcharts of COVID Response Process — Staff & Student

These charts were developed by ESD 112 in coordination with the Clark County Health Department. They provide a concise summary of the response processes that you will follow in the checklist charts found in pages 9-12. For more information, visit the CCPH Website.

COVID-19 Staff Symptom Flow Chart (PDF)

COVID-19 Student Symptom Flow Chart (PDF)

WSD Protocols

Protocol 1.0: Staff or Student on Arrival to WSD (Click here to download PDF)

Protocol 2.0: During the Day for Students — Applicable to both School and Cottages (PDF)

Protocol 3.0: During the Work Day for Staff (PDF)

Protocol 4.0: Self-Reported Close Contact, Diagnosis, or Symptoms (PDF)

School Wide Communications – Situational Guidance (PDF)